TRADE FINANCE (Workshop – 15 PDU for CDCS & CSDG) – THE TRENDS, LATEST DEVELOPMENT, OPINIONS & LEGAL CASES

October 2, 2018

TWO DAY WORKSHOP ON
TRADE FINANCE –
THE TRENDS, LATEST DEVELOPMENT, OPINIONS & LEGAL CASES

 15/11/2018 09.00 to 16/11/2018 17.00 (Asia/Indonesia)

  T.B.A

INTRODUCTION
Trade finance, which has been described as the “fuel” of international trade, contributes significantly to wealth creation and economic development. Without the underlying support of finance, many of the trade opportunities that create jobs and steer economic growth would be overlooked. The dynamics surrounding trade finance are the backdrop against which financial regulation and the correspondent banking challenge are assessed.

The trade barriers will hit emerging markets, such as those in Asia and Africa — markets that in the past few years many Nordic businesses have counted on as an export growth opportunity.

Risk and compliance

Trade finance has been proven to be a consistently low-risk proposition, with minimal default rates (albeit growing, according to latest ICC reports). But, like all financial transactions, trade finance is subject to a range of compliance restrictions, including AML, sanctions, KYC and KYCC.

Improving access to trade finance is becoming increasingly important for developing countries, many of which are experiencing increases in production opportunities as a result of the evolving patterns of trade. While many factors impact international trade financing, legal and regulatory frameworks are a critical yet often-overlooked element affecting the ability of the international trading system to deliver broad-based economic development benefits.

The Legal and Regulatory Landscape of Bank-Intermediated Trade Finance

The legal and regulatory environment affecting bank-intermediated finance is multilayered and sometimes complex. At least three major types of regulatory measures arranged according to functional lines, regulate banking in most countries around the world

The Effects of the Legal and Regulatory

Typically, bank-intermediated trade financing comprises loans given by banks to importers or exporters in the form of working capital or on a recourse basis against a confirmed export order, as well as credit given in the form of a number of trade-finance instruments. The most common instruments of bank-intermediated finance are letters of credit (commercial and standby), guarantees and documentary
collections. Through these instruments, a bank ultimately agrees to vouch for an importer’s or exporter’s creditworthiness.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
▪ Trade Finance Marketing & Operations Officers/Managers
▪ Relationship Managers
▪ Internal Auditors
▪ Compliance Officers

WHY SHOULD ATTEND
▪ To help the officers better understand the functions and risks of the products offered by the banks to their trade customers.
▪ After learning from the course, the officers should be able to market the service to the customers and avoid making mistakes when structuring the transactions

Instructor

Dr. Soh Chee Seng

Dr. Soh Chee Seng is Technical Consultant on Trade Finance Issues for the Association of Banks in Singapore and External Trade Finance Adviser of a number of banks in Asia Pacific. He has more than 25 years experience in trade finance operations with local and foreign banks in Singapore and Malaysia. He currently serves as a member of the UCP600 Drafting Group commissioned by the ICC Banking Commission to revise UCP500. He served as a member of the task force on international standard banking practice for documentary credits. Dr. Soh is also a member of the Panel of Experts, International Chambers of Commerce (ICC) Rules for Documentary Credit Dispute Resolution Expertise (DOCDEX).

Dr. Soh has been invited by the a number of financial institutions and bankers associations in South East Asia to conduct a series of workshops on international trade finance, risks in trade finance, ISBP, UCP500, ISP98 and Incoterms 2000. He has also been invited by the Supreme People’s Court of China, Shanghai High People’s Court and Tianjin High People’s Court to conduct seminars on ISBP for the judges in China. He has been invited as an expert witness to give his opinions on numerous LC cases in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and South Korea.

Dr. Soh received his Ph.D. in law from the China University of Political Science and Law in 2011. He received his first degree, Bachelor of Commerce degree with first class honours major in Economics, from Nanyang University, Singapore, in 1973, and completed the Advanced Bank Management Program with the Asian Institute of Management in Manila in 1986.

Download Proposal di sini:

PROPOSAL WORKSHOP NOVEMBER

DAFTAR TRAINING

Data Pribadi



Data Perusahaan








Share This
X